Catechetical Underpinnings of Sailing with the Holy Trinity Catholic Faith Camp 2018

Saint Timothy Catholic Faith Camp is committed to protecting the children who attend and assuring that all information presented is consistent with the teachings of the Catholic Church.  The Curriculum:  Saint Patrick and the Holy Trinity was reviewed by Rev. David L. Rasner, J.C.L. and granted the Nihil Obstat on September 2, 2005 and the Imprimatur was granted by the Most Reverend William L. Higi on November 18, 2005.

We have provided the references in the Catechism of the Catholic Church that apply to the teachings of this curriculum.  For more information on the Catechism including how to order a hard copy or review the complete Catechism on-line, please go to: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Catechism of the Catholic Church.

105 God is the author of Sacred Scripture. “The divinely revealed realities, which are contained and presented in the text of Sacred Scripture, have been written down under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.”  (Vatican Council II, Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, Dei Verbum 11)

THE ANGELS

The existence of angels – a truth of faith

328 The existence of the spiritual, non-corporeal beings that Sacred Scripture usually calls “angels” is a truth of faith. The witness of Scripture is as clear as the unanimity of Tradition.

Who are they?

329  St. Augustine says: “‘Angel’ is the name of their office, not of their nature. If you seek the name of their nature, it is ‘spirit’; if you seek the name of their office, it is ‘angel’: from what they are, ‘spirit’, from what they do, ‘angel.'” (St. Augustine, En. in Ps. 103, 1, 15: PL 37, 1348) With their whole beings the angels are servants and messengers of God. Because they “always behold the face of my Father who is in heaven” they are the “mighty ones who do his word, hearkening to the voice of his word”.  (Mt 18:10; Ps 103:20)

330 As purely spiritual creatures angels have intelligence and will: they are personal and immortal creatures, surpassing in perfection all visible creatures, as the splendour of their glory bears witness. (Cf. Pius XII, Humani generis: DS 3891; Lk 20:36; Dan 10:9- 12).

517 Christ’s whole life is a mystery of redemption. Redemption comes to us above all through the blood of his cross, (Cf. Eph 1:7; Col 1:13-14; 2 Pt 1:18-19), but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life: -already in his Incarnation through which by becoming poor he enriches us with his poverty; (Cf. 2 Cor 8:9).

  • in his hidden life which by his submission atones for our disobedience; (Cf. Lk 2:51)
  • in his word which purifies its hearers; (Cf. Jn 15:3)
  • in his healings and exorcisms by which “he took our infirmities and bore our diseases”; (Mt 8:17; cf. Is 53:4)
  • and in his Resurrection by which he justifies (Cf. Rom 4:25)

538   The Gospels speak of a time of solitude for Jesus in the desert immediately after his baptism by John. Driven by the Spirit into the desert, Jesus remains there for forty days without eating; he lives among wild beasts, and angels minister to him. (Cf. Mk 1:12-13)  At the end of this time Satan tempts him three times, seeking to compromise his filial attitude toward God. Jesus rebuffs these attacks, which recapitulate the temptations of Adam in Paradise and of Israel in the desert, and the devil leaves him “until an opportune time”. (Lk 4:13)

539 The evangelists indicate the salvific meaning of this mysterious event: Jesus is the new Adam who remained faithful just where the first Adam had given in to temptation. Jesus fulfils Israel’s vocation perfectly: in contrast to those who had once provoked God during forty years in the desert, Christ reveals himself as God’s Servant, totally obedient to the divine will. In this, Jesus is the devil’s conqueror: he “binds the strong man” to take back his plunder. (Cf. Ps 95:10; Mk 3:27) Jesus’ victory over the tempter in the desert anticipates victory at the Passion, the supreme act of obedience of his filial love for the Father.

610 Jesus gave the supreme expression of his free offering of himself at the meal shared with the twelve Apostles “on the night he was betrayed”. (Roman Missal, EP III; cf. Mt 26:20; I Cor 11:23).  On the eve of his Passion, while still free, Jesus transformed this Last Supper with the apostles into the memorial of his voluntary offering to the Father for the salvation of men: “This is my body which is given for you.” “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” (Lk 22:19; Mt 26:28; cf. I5.7Cor 5:7)

611  The Eucharist that Christ institutes at that moment will be the memorial of his sacrifice. (1 Cor 11:25.) Jesus includes the apostles in his own offering and bids them perpetuate it. (Cf. Lk 22:19).  By doing so, the Lord institutes his apostles as priests of the New Covenant: “For their sakes   I sanctify myself, so that they also may be sanctified in truth.” (Jn 17:19; cf. Council of Trent: DS 1752; 1764).

666  Jesus Christ, the head of the Church, precedes us into the Father’s glorious kingdom so that we, the members of his Body, may live in the hope of one day being with him forever.

956 The intercession of the saints. “Being more closely united to Christ, those who dwell in heaven fix the whole Church more firmly in holiness…. They do not cease to intercede with the Father for us, as they proffer the merits which they acquired on earth through the one mediator between God and men, Christ Jesus…. So by their fraternal concern is our weakness greatly helped.” (LG 49; cf. 1 Tim 2:5).

Do not weep, for I shall be more useful to you after my death and I shall help you then more effectively than during my life. (St. Dominic, dying, to his brothers).

I want to spend my heaven in doing good on earth. (St. Therese of Lisieux, the Final Conversations, tr. John Clarke (Washington: ICS, 1977), 102).

986 By Christ’s will, the Church possesses the power to forgive the sins of the baptized and exercises it through bishops and priests normally in the sacrament of Penance.

987  “In the forgiveness of sins, both priests and sacraments are instruments which our Lord Jesus Christ, the only author and liberal giver of salvation, wills to use in order to efface our sins and give us the grace of justification” (Roman Catechism, I, 11, 6).

1353  In the epiclesis, the Church asks the Father to send his Holy Spirit (or the power of his blessing) on the bread and wine, so that by his power they may become the body and blood of Jesus Christ and so that those who take part in the Eucharist may be one body and one spirit (some liturgical traditions put the epiclesis after the anamnesis).

In the institution narrative, the power of the words and the action of Christ, and the power of the Holy Spirit, make sacramentally present under the species of bread and wine Christ’s body and blood, his sacrifice offered on the cross once for all.

1413 By the consecration the transubstantiation of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ is brought about. Under the consecrated species of bread and wine Christ himself, living and glorious, is present in a true, real, and substantial manner: his Body and his Blood, with his soul and his divinity (cf. Council of Trent: DS 1640; 1651).

ARTICLE 6 THE SACRAMENT OF HOLY ORDERS

1536 Holy Orders is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to his apostles continues to be exercised in the Church until the end of time: thus it is the sacrament of apostolic ministry. It includes three degrees: episcopate, presbyterate, and diaconate.

(On the institution and mission of the apostolic ministry by Christ, see above, no. 874 ff. Here only the sacramental means by which this ministry is handed on will be treated.)

1548 In the ecclesial service of the ordained minister, it is Christ himself who is present to his Church as Head of his Body, Shepherd of his flock, high priest of the redemptive sacrifice, Teacher of Truth. This is what the Church means by saying that the priest, by virtue of the sacrament of Holy Orders, acts in persona Christi Capitis:  (Cf. LG 10; 28; SC 33; CD 11; PO 2; 6.)  It is the same priest, Christ Jesus, whose sacred person his minister truly represents. Now the minister, by reason of the sacerdotal consecration which he has received, is truly made like to the high priest and possesses the authority to act in the power and place of the person of Christ himself (virtute ac persona ipsius Christi). (Pius XII, encyclical, Mediator Dei: AAS, 39 (1947) 548).

Christ is the source of all priesthood: the priest of the old law was a figure of Christ, and the priest of the new law acts in the person of Christ. (St. Thomas Aquinas, STh III, 22, 4c.)

1551 This priesthood is ministerial. “That office . . . which the Lord committed to the pastors of his people, is in the strict sense of the term a service.” (LG 24.)

It is entirely related to Christ and to men. It depends entirely on Christ and on his unique priesthood; it has been instituted for the good of men and the communion of the Church. the sacrament of Holy Orders communicates a “sacred power” which is none other than that of Christ. the exercise of this authority must therefore be measured against the model of Christ, who by love made himself the least and the servant of all. (Cf. Mk 10 43-45; 1 Pet 5:3.)  “The Lord said clearly that concern for his flock was proof of love for him.” (St. John Chrysostom, De sac. 2, 4: PG 48, 636; cf. Jn 21:15-17.. . . “in the name of the whole Church”)

1552 The ministerial priesthood has the task not only of representing Christ – Head of the Church – before the assembly of the faithful, but also of acting in the name of the whole Church when presenting to God the prayer of the Church, and above all when offering the Eucharistic sacrifice. (Cf. SC 33N; LG 10.)

1558  “Episcopal consecration confers, together with the office of sanctifying, also the offices of teaching and ruling…. In fact … by the imposition of hands and through the words of the consecration, the grace of the Holy Spirit is given, and a sacred character is impressed in such wise that bishops, in an eminent and visible manner, take the place of Christ himself, teacher, shepherd, and priest, and act as his representative (in Eius persona agant).” (LG 21).  “By virtue, therefore, of the Holy Spirit who has been given to them, bishops have been constituted true and authentic teachers of the faith and have been made pontiffs and pastors.” (CD 2 # 2.)

1563 “Because it is joined with the episcopal order the office of priests shares in the authority by which Christ himself builds up and sanctifies and rules his Body. Hence the priesthood of priests, while presupposing the sacraments of initiation, is nevertheless conferred by its own particular sacrament. Through that sacrament priests by the anointing of the Holy Spirit are signed with a special character and so are configured to Christ the priest in such a way that they are able to act in the person of Christ the head.” (PO 2.)

1565 Through the sacrament of Holy Orders priests share in the universal dimensions of the mission that Christ entrusted to the apostles. The spiritual gift they have received in ordination prepares them, not for a limited and restricted mission, “but for the fullest, in fact the universal mission of salvation ‘to the end of the earth,” (PO 10; OT 20; cf. Acts 1:8.) “prepared in spirit to preach the Gospel everywhere.” (OT 20.)

 Faith

1814 Faith is the theological virtue by which we believe in God and believe all that he has said and revealed to us, and that Holy Church proposes for our belief, because he is truth itself. By faith “man freely commits his entire self to God.”78 For this reason the believer seeks to know and do God’s will. “The righteous shall live by faith.” Living faith “work(s) through charity.” (Rom 1:17; Gal 5:6.)

1847  “God created us without us: but he did not will to save us without us.”  (St. Augustine, Sermo 169, 11, 13: PL 38, 923.)  To receive his mercy, we must admit our faults. “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” (1 Jn 8-9.)

The Definition of Sin

1849  Sin is an offense against reason, truth, and right conscience; it is failure in genuine love for God and neighbor caused by a perverse attachment to certain goods. It wounds the nature of man and injures human solidarity. It has been defined as “an utterance, a deed, or a desire contrary to the eternal law.” (St. Augustine, Contra Faustum 22: PL 42, 418; St. Thomas Aquinas, STh I-II, 71, 6.)

1850  Sin is an offense against God: “Against you, you alone, have I sinned, and done that which is evil in your sight.” (Ps 51:4.) Sin sets itself against God’s love for us and turns our hearts away from it. Like the first sin, it is disobedience, a revolt against God through the will to become “like gods,” (Gen 3:5) knowing and determining good and evil. Sin is thus “love of oneself even to contempt of God.” (St. Augustine, De civ. Dei 14, 28: PL 41, 436).  In this proud self-exaltation, sin is diametrically opposed to the obedience of Jesus, which achieves our salvation. (Cf. Phil 2:6-9.)

Article 3 GUIDES FOR PRAYER

2683 The witnesses who have preceded us into the kingdom,41 especially those whom the Church recognizes as saints, share in the living tradition of prayer by the example of their lives, the transmission of their writings, and their prayer today. They contemplate God, praise him and constantly care for those whom they have left on earth. When they entered into the joy of their Master, they were “put in charge of many things.” (Cf. Mt 25:21) Their intercession is their most exalted service to God’s plan. We can and should ask them to intercede for us and for the whole world.

2722    Vocal prayer, founded on the union of body and soul in human nature, associates the body with the interior prayer of the heart, following Christ’s example of praying to his Father and teaching the Our Father to his disciples.

2774  “The Lord’s Prayer is truly the summary of the whole gospel,” (Tertullian, De orat. 1 PL 1, 1251-1255.) The “most perfect of prayers.” (St. Thomas Aquinas, STh II-II, 83, 9.)  It is at the center of the Scriptures.

2839   With bold confidence, we began praying to our Father. In begging him that his name be hallowed, we were in fact asking him that we ourselves might be always made more holy. But though we are clothed with the baptismal garment, we do not cease to sin, to turn away from God. Now, in this new petition, we return to him like the prodigal son and, like the tax collector, recognize that we are sinners before him.  (Cf. Lk 15:11-32, 18:13.)  Our petition begins with a “confession” of our wretchedness and his mercy. Our hope is firm because, in his Son, “we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.” (Col 1:14; Eph 1:7.) We find the efficacious and undoubted sign of his forgiveness in the sacraments of his Church. (Cf. Mt 26:28; Jn 20:23.)

2844  Christian prayer extends to the forgiveness of enemies,  (Cf. Mt 5:43-44.) transfiguring the disciple by configuring him to his Master. Forgiveness is a high-point of Christian prayer; only hearts attuned to God’s compassion can receive the gift of prayer. Forgiveness also bears witness that, in our world, love is stronger than sin. The martyrs of yesterday and today bear this witness to Jesus. Forgiveness is the fundamental condition of the reconciliation of the children of God with their Father and of men with one another.  (Cf. 2 Cor 5:18-21; John Paul II, DM 14.)

“And Lead Us not into Temptation”

2846 This petition goes to the root of the preceding one, for our sins result from our consenting to temptation; we therefore ask our Father not to “lead” us into temptation. It is difficult to translate the Greek verb used by a single English word: the Greek means both “do not allow us to enter into temptation” and “do not let us yield to temptation.” (Cf. Mt 26 41.)  “God cannot be tempted by evil and he himself tempts no one”; (Jas 113) on the contrary, he wants to set us free from evil. We ask him not to allow us to take the way that leads to sin. We are engaged in the battle “between flesh and spirit”; this petition implores the Spirit of discernment and strength.

2861  In the fourth petition, by saying “give us,” we express in communion with our brethren our filial trust in our heavenly Father. “Our daily bread” refers to the earthly nourishment necessary to everyone for subsistence, and also to the Bread of Life: the Word of God and the Body of Christ. It is received in God’s “today,” as the indispensable, (super – ) essential nourishment of the feast of the coming Kingdom anticipated in the Eucharist.

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